Author Topic: Double Crossed: Uncovering the Catholic Church's Betrayal of American Nuns  (Read 202 times)

Geremia

From what I have read of Double Crossed: Uncovering the Catholic Church's Betrayal of American Nuns by Kenneth Briggs so far, the reason female religious got hit the hardest after Vatican II (teaching sisters down 94%, much worse than priestly vocations!) is because of Vatican II's leveling of the married and religious states (and lay and sacerdotal states):
Quote from: Chapter Four: Vatican II: Unforeseen Consequences
The most comprehensive was the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church (Lumen Gentium) because, as the U.S. Constitution did for the United States, it provided Catholics a basic understanding of how the Church defined itself. Among its stunning conclusions: Roman Catholicism no longer insisted that it was the “one true church,” and clergy and hierarchy ceased ranking above the laity. Baptism was the ticket that admitted all Catholics equally to the Church as the “people of God”; it was similar to the rights conferred by citizenship in democracies. Other distinctions in the Church, such as ordination, important as they might be, were to be considered secondary to that godly peoplehood. Of most significance to nuns was the startling claim about what it meant to be holy. The bishops scuttled the idea that some (primarily nuns, priests, and bishops) should aim to be holy while most laity need not bother. In its place, they insisted that holiness is the responsibility of every Catholic. Precisely this pursuit of holiness had elevated nuns and priests to a level above that of the laity. Now the mystique was threatened. A single phrase had ended a virtual monopoly.
and because of the difficulty in upholding the vow of obedience (even more difficult than that of chastity), among other reasons.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2018, 09:31:47 PM by Geremia »
 

annamack

From what I have read of Double Crossed: Uncovering the Catholic Church's Betrayal of American Nuns by Kenneth Briggs so far, the reason female religious got hit the hardest after Vatican II (teaching sisters down 94%, much worse than priestly vocations!) is because of Vatican II's leveling of the married and religious states (and lay and sacerdotal states) and because of the difficulty in upholding the vow of obedience (even more difficult than that of chastity).
Quote from: «Double Crosseds» description
This groundbreaking exposé of the mistreatment of nuns by the Catholic Church reveals a history of unfulfilled promises, misuse of clerical power, and a devastating failure to recognize the singular contributions of these religious women. 

The Roman Catholic Church in America has lost nearly 100,000 religious sisters in the last forty years, a much greater loss than the priesthood. While the explanation is partly cultural—contemporary women have more choices in work and life—Kenneth Briggs contends that the rapid disappearance of convents can be traced directly to the Church’s betrayal of the promises of reform made by the Second Vatican Council

In Double Crossed, Briggs documents the pattern of marginalization and exploitation that has reduced nuns to second-, even third-class citizens within the Catholic Church. America’s religious sisters were remarkable, adventurous women. They educated children, managed health care of the sick, and reached out to the poor and homeless. They went to universities and into executive chairs. Their efforts and successes, however, brought little appreciation from the Church, which demeaned their roles, deprived them of power, and placed them under the absolute authority of the all-male clergy. 

Replete with quotations from nuns and former nuns, Double Crossed uncovers a dark secret at the heart of the Catholic Church. Their voices and Briggs’s research provide compelling insights into why the number of religious sisters has declined so precipitously in recent decades—and why, unless reforms are introduced, nuns may vanish forever in America.

So. the reason for the decline in female religious after V2 is that there wasn't enough V2?!!
 

Nctradcath

Why do penance for sinners in a convent when “Everyone goes to heaven” according to V2 and its antipopes?
 

Nctradcath

It would be the definition of insanity.
 
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Rubecorks

From what I have read of Double Crossed: Uncovering the Catholic Church's Betrayal of American Nuns by Kenneth Briggs so far, the reason female religious got hit the hardest after Vatican II (teaching sisters down 94%, much worse than priestly vocations!) is because of Vatican II's leveling of the married and religious states (and lay and sacerdotal states) and because of the difficulty in upholding the vow of obedience (even more difficult than that of chastity).
Quote from: «Double Crosseds» description
This groundbreaking exposé of the mistreatment of nuns by the Catholic Church reveals a history of unfulfilled promises, misuse of clerical power, and a devastating failure to recognize the singular contributions of these religious women. 

The Roman Catholic Church in America has lost nearly 100,000 religious sisters in the last forty years, a much greater loss than the priesthood. While the explanation is partly cultural—contemporary women have more choices in work and life—Kenneth Briggs contends that the rapid disappearance of convents can be traced directly to the Church’s betrayal of the promises of reform made by the Second Vatican Council

In Double Crossed, Briggs documents the pattern of marginalization and exploitation that has reduced nuns to second-, even third-class citizens within the Catholic Church. America’s religious sisters were remarkable, adventurous women. They educated children, managed health care of the sick, and reached out to the poor and homeless. They went to universities and into executive chairs. Their efforts and successes, however, brought little appreciation from the Church, which demeaned their roles, deprived them of power, and placed them under the absolute authority of the all-male clergy. 

Replete with quotations from nuns and former nuns, Double Crossed uncovers a dark secret at the heart of the Catholic Church. Their voices and Briggs’s research provide compelling insights into why the number of religious sisters has declined so precipitously in recent decades—and why, unless reforms are introduced, nuns may vanish forever in America.

Sounds like the author doesn't really have it straight.

EVERYTHING suffered by Vatican II, because the enemy wanted destruction of Catholicism. It wasn't just religious sisters; EVERYTHING suffered, because the enemy was in control at the top.




 
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TKGS

From what I have read of Double Crossed: Uncovering the Catholic Church's Betrayal of American Nuns by Kenneth Briggs so far, the reason female religious got hit the hardest after Vatican II (teaching sisters down 94%, much worse than priestly vocations!) is because of Vatican II's leveling of the married and religious states (and lay and sacerdotal states) and because of the difficulty in upholding the vow of obedience (even more difficult than that of chastity).
Quote from: «Double Crosseds» description
This groundbreaking exposé of the mistreatment of nuns by the Catholic Church reveals a history of unfulfilled promises, misuse of clerical power, and a devastating failure to recognize the singular contributions of these religious women. 

The Roman Catholic Church in America has lost nearly 100,000 religious sisters in the last forty years, a much greater loss than the priesthood. While the explanation is partly cultural—contemporary women have more choices in work and life—Kenneth Briggs contends that the rapid disappearance of convents can be traced directly to the Church’s betrayal of the promises of reform made by the Second Vatican Council

In Double Crossed, Briggs documents the pattern of marginalization and exploitation that has reduced nuns to second-, even third-class citizens within the Catholic Church. America’s religious sisters were remarkable, adventurous women. They educated children, managed health care of the sick, and reached out to the poor and homeless. They went to universities and into executive chairs. Their efforts and successes, however, brought little appreciation from the Church, which demeaned their roles, deprived them of power, and placed them under the absolute authority of the all-male clergy

Replete with quotations from nuns and former nuns, Double Crossed uncovers a dark secret at the heart of the Catholic Church. Their voices and Briggs’s research provide compelling insights into why the number of religious sisters has declined so precipitously in recent decades—and why, unless reforms are introduced, nuns may vanish forever in America.

So. the reason for the decline in female religious after V2 is that there wasn't enough V2?!!

I thought this too, but also saw this second line I bolded.  Did the Conciliar sect begin directing the day-to-day lives of the nuns?  Just when were the convents not, ultimately, under the absolute authority of the bishop (i.e., "the all-male clergy")?  The problem wasn't that they were under the authority of the bishops, rather, it was that the bishops simply stopped caring about their spiritual welfare--just as they stopped caring about everyone's spiritual welfare.
 

Geremia

I thought this too, but also saw this second line I bolded.  Did the Conciliar sect begin directing the day-to-day lives of the nuns?  Just when were the convents not, ultimately, under the absolute authority of the bishop (i.e., "the all-male clergy")?  The problem wasn't that they were under the authority of the bishops, rather, it was that the bishops simply stopped caring about their spiritual welfare--just as they stopped caring about everyone's spiritual welfare.
I've changed the OP to include a quote from his chapter on Vatican II, which is spot-on. The description I had previously posted was not very representative of the book, and had a liberal/feminist slant.

Barbara

Sounds like in this book we don't hear from another group of nuns who felt betrayed by V2, and that is the group that loathed the changes, were aghast at the NOM, and who loved the religious garb they were forced to abandon. Imagine the crisis of obedience for them, especially nuns who already were elderly at the time of V2.

Some of these nuns stayed in their orders and suffered an untold martyrdom for the rest of their lives, while others left entirely or transferred to orders that they perceived were more "traditional."

 

Mother of God, pray for us sinners.
 
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annamack

From what I have read of Double Crossed: Uncovering the Catholic Church's Betrayal of American Nuns by Kenneth Briggs so far, the reason female religious got hit the hardest after Vatican II (teaching sisters down 94%, much worse than priestly vocations!) is because of Vatican II's leveling of the married and religious states (and lay and sacerdotal states) and because of the difficulty in upholding the vow of obedience (even more difficult than that of chastity).
Quote from: «Double Crosseds» description
This groundbreaking exposé of the mistreatment of nuns by the Catholic Church reveals a history of unfulfilled promises, misuse of clerical power, and a devastating failure to recognize the singular contributions of these religious women. 

The Roman Catholic Church in America has lost nearly 100,000 religious sisters in the last forty years, a much greater loss than the priesthood. While the explanation is partly cultural—contemporary women have more choices in work and life—Kenneth Briggs contends that the rapid disappearance of convents can be traced directly to the Church’s betrayal of the promises of reform made by the Second Vatican Council

In Double Crossed, Briggs documents the pattern of marginalization and exploitation that has reduced nuns to second-, even third-class citizens within the Catholic Church. America’s religious sisters were remarkable, adventurous women. They educated children, managed health care of the sick, and reached out to the poor and homeless. They went to universities and into executive chairs. Their efforts and successes, however, brought little appreciation from the Church, which demeaned their roles, deprived them of power, and placed them under the absolute authority of the all-male clergy

Replete with quotations from nuns and former nuns, Double Crossed uncovers a dark secret at the heart of the Catholic Church. Their voices and Briggs’s research provide compelling insights into why the number of religious sisters has declined so precipitously in recent decades—and why, unless reforms are introduced, nuns may vanish forever in America.

So. the reason for the decline in female religious after V2 is that there wasn't enough V2?!!

I thought this too, but also saw this second line I bolded.  Did the Conciliar sect begin directing the day-to-day lives of the nuns?  Just when were the convents not, ultimately, under the absolute authority of the bishop (i.e., "the all-male clergy")?  The problem wasn't that they were under the authority of the bishops, rather, it was that the bishops simply stopped caring about their spiritual welfare--just as they stopped caring about everyone's spiritual welfare.

It read to me as if V2 promised more autonomy and "equality" but didn't deliver.  If that wasn't what the writer of Double Crossed... intended, then the quote was, perhaps, taken out of context. 
 

TKGS

It read to me as if V2 promised more autonomy and "equality" but didn't deliver.  If that wasn't what the writer of Double Crossed... intended, then the quote was, perhaps, taken out of context.

I can see that reading as well.  In any event, the summary of the book doesn't make me want to read it.  Perhaps I will see if the library can obtain it (purchase or inter-library loan), but I won't purchase it myself.