Author Topic: Double Crossed: Uncovering the Catholic Church's Betrayal of American Nuns  (Read 199 times)

TKGS

Re: Double Crossed: Uncovering the Catholic Church's Betrayal of American Nuns
« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2018, 12:36:33 PM »
I put my other reading assignments on hold for a few days as I obtained Double Crossed from my local library through the inter-library loan program.  The book is on loan from a local public university library.

The book is written entirely from the perspective that everything prior to Vatican 2 was old-fashioned, out of touch, and bad and that Vatican 2 fixed everything--except that the power-hungry bishops thwarted the "renewal" of the convents and the sisters that the Council promised. 

After recounting how the convents were actually bursting at the seams during the first half of the twentieth Century with huge numbers of vocations coming in the 1950s, the author quotes a Modernist cardinal writing that the "contemporary nun 'appears to the faithful to be out of touch with the world' [and is] too isolated, too remote, too encased in a habit that estranged her from the very people she would serve."

The book explains how Vatican 2 was called because of the "crisis [of] the widening gulf between Catholicism and modernity."  It explains how the Church was "increasingly isolated".  But, thanks to Pope John XXIII who "grasped the problem", Vatican 2 was called to fix the problems that had been previously identified by "Europe's leading Catholic thinkers", such as, Karl Rahner, Hans Küng, and Yves Congar.

The author describes the "plight" of religious sisters by recounting one anecdote told by an agéd sister about the first time she visited home.  As she and her mother got up to step off the bus, an elderly woman stepped back to defer to the young nun.  She said she never felt so humiliated in all her life!  She reminded me of the type of woman back when I was a teenager in the 1970s and opened the door for a woman only to have her sneer that her arms aren't broken and that she is perfectly capable of opening doors on her own.  (To this day, I've noticed that most women of a certain age never acknowledge or say thank you to any courtesies; but, at least, they don't sneer anymore.)

Never does the author see that it was Vatican 2 that caused the Crisis, not the other way round.  The nuns were a part of Catholic life, but, because, he thinks, Vatican 2 was just not truly implemented in the case of the convents, the sisters are now a dying breed.  He closes with this short paragraph:

Quote
Meanwhile, even as some communities prepare to die as gracefully as they can, the Ursulines of Paola and other groups rich in memory continue not only to shrink but to plan and to hope for a future they cannot yet see.  From a further remove, however, the great body of older, Mass-going American Catholics wonder what happened to that huge cohort of remarkable, black-swathed women who appeared and disappeared from their vulnerable lives.

I'm sure that this author, had he been alive a few centuries ago, would have been of the sort who, when he saw that the sick patient wasn't getting better after a good bleeding, would prescribe more bleeding.  I'd put the author in the category of the typical Modernist.  Whether he's a "conservative" Modernists or a "liberal" Modernist, I don't know, but he is definitely a Modernist--and a sad historian.

I do not recommend this book.
 
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annamack

Re: Double Crossed: Uncovering the Catholic Church's Betrayal of American Nuns
« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2018, 01:56:42 PM »
I put my other reading assignments on hold for a few days as I obtained Double Crossed from my local library through the inter-library loan program.  The book is on loan from a local public university library.

The book is written entirely from the perspective that everything prior to Vatican 2 was old-fashioned, out of touch, and bad and that Vatican 2 fixed everything--except that the power-hungry bishops thwarted the "renewal" of the convents and the sisters that the Council promised. 

After recounting how the convents were actually bursting at the seams during the first half of the twentieth Century with huge numbers of vocations coming in the 1950s, the author quotes a Modernist cardinal writing that the "contemporary nun 'appears to the faithful to be out of touch with the world' [and is] too isolated, too remote, too encased in a habit that estranged her from the very people she would serve."

The book explains how Vatican 2 was called because of the "crisis [of] the widening gulf between Catholicism and modernity."  It explains how the Church was "increasingly isolated".  But, thanks to Pope John XXIII who "grasped the problem", Vatican 2 was called to fix the problems that had been previously identified by "Europe's leading Catholic thinkers", such as, Karl Rahner, Hans Küng, and Yves Congar.

The author describes the "plight" of religious sisters by recounting one anecdote told by an agéd sister about the first time she visited home.  As she and her mother got up to step off the bus, an elderly woman stepped back to defer to the young nun.  She said she never felt so humiliated in all her life!  She reminded me of the type of woman back when I was a teenager in the 1970s and opened the door for a woman only to have her sneer that her arms aren't broken and that she is perfectly capable of opening doors on her own.  (To this day, I've noticed that most women of a certain age never acknowledge or say thank you to any courtesies; but, at least, they don't sneer anymore.)

Never does the author see that it was Vatican 2 that caused the Crisis, not the other way round.  The nuns were a part of Catholic life, but, because, he thinks, Vatican 2 was just not truly implemented in the case of the convents, the sisters are now a dying breed.  He closes with this short paragraph:

Quote
Meanwhile, even as some communities prepare to die as gracefully as they can, the Ursulines of Paola and other groups rich in memory continue not only to shrink but to plan and to hope for a future they cannot yet see.  From a further remove, however, the great body of older, Mass-going American Catholics wonder what happened to that huge cohort of remarkable, black-swathed women who appeared and disappeared from their vulnerable lives.

I'm sure that this author, had he been alive a few centuries ago, would have been of the sort who, when he saw that the sick patient wasn't getting better after a good bleeding, would prescribe more bleeding.  I'd put the author in the category of the typical Modernist.  Whether he's a "conservative" Modernists or a "liberal" Modernist, I don't know, but he is definitely a Modernist--and a sad historian.

I do not recommend this book.

So, the whole book was essentially summed up in the quote in the opening post, then?
 

TKGS

Re: Double Crossed: Uncovering the Catholic Church's Betrayal of American Nuns
« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2018, 03:12:26 PM »
So, the whole book was essentially summed up in the quote in the opening post, then?

I think so.
 
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ClemensMaria

Re: Double Crossed: Uncovering the Catholic Church's Betrayal of American Nuns
« Reply #13 on: February 08, 2018, 10:08:56 PM »
You found this on the contemporary fiction shelf, right?
 
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Barbara

Re: Double Crossed: Uncovering the Catholic Church's Betrayal of American Nuns
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2018, 04:46:12 AM »
TKGS- Thank you for reading this. Sounds like it was a penance, but you did a service to the forum. It's always better to have a review from someone who actually read the book, attended the conference, spoke to a priest, etc., than to rely on second or third-hand accounts.

Years ago I read an encyclical, or whatever he called it, by Cardinal Ratzinger, "Pope" Benedict, in order to report on it at a forum. Thought I would gag, but it was appreciated by others as I recall.


Mother of God, pray for us sinners.
 
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